technology

Dr. Kurt Rossow - Disease Mapping for PRRS


Disease Mapping for PRRS - Dr. Kurt Rossow, DVM, Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Minnesota, from the 2013 Minnesota Pork Congress, January 16-17, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Dr. Joel DeRouchey - Managing High Feed Costs


Managing High Feed Costs - Dr. Joel DeRouchey, Professor and Swine Extension Specialist, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, from the 2013 Minnesota Pork Congress, January 16-17, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Dr. Pam Zaabel - Secure pork supply: FAD Outbreak Business Continuity


Secure pork supply: FAD Outbreak Business Continuity - Dr. Pam Zaabel, from the 2012 Allen D. Leman Swine Conference, September 15-18, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA.

Dr. Matt Anderson - Antibiotic use and future records necessary to keep the government and our customers happy


Antibiotic use and future records necessary to keep the government and our customers happy - Dr. Matt Anderson, from the 2012 Allen D. Leman Swine Conference, September 15-18, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA.

Dr. John McGlone - Market pig transport


Market pig transport - Dr. John McGlone, from the 2012 Allen D. Leman Swine Conference, September 15-18, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA.

2012 Allen D. Leman Swine Conference

2012 Leman Swine Conference 2012 Allen D. Leman Swine Conference The annual Allen D. Leman Swine Conference, held September 15-18, in St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, is a showcase gathering of swine practitioners, researchers, and producers joined by affiliated industry to share best practice experience and cutting-edge research. Thanks to the generosity of the University of Minnesota Veterinary Continuing Education team, hundreds of hours of preparation and presentation are distilled here for your review.

Dr. Dave Pyburn - SIV Surveillance and Recent Fair Human Infections


SIV Surveillance and Recent Fair Human Infections - Dr. Dave Pyburn, USDA, APHIS, VS, from the 2012 Allen D. Leman Swine Conference, September 15-18, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA.

American Observations on Life in China

Life in ChinaCities and Swine Seemingly everywhere one looks China offers two views of today. Outside the Weifang train station, open spaces and modern, even futuristic buildings give the appearance of a prosperous nation ready to lead on the world stage. In truth, many of the offices and apartments we observed were empty. The leaders use construction to employ the people on the assumption that it's cheaper to build today than it will be tomorrow. Inside these buildings are cement walls and roughed in plumbing. Around the corner you see workers on a bamboo raft clearing algae from a retention pond, using technology of decades past.

My recent China sojourn, with JBS-United, was a reminder of the massive changes our North American swine industry has embraced. Internal issues (genetics, disease, feed quality) and external issues (feed costs, blasted hot weather, immigration) have been dealt with and cataloged for future "black swan" events. The overwhelming sense of purpose, unity, vast resources that I viewed as we traveled is offset by flexibility, adaptability, hygiene and husbandry here at home. It's easy to be awed by the China machine but we have the lead and the know-how to maintain it [Editor note: text and photo Ned Arthur, SwineCast].

Sighings of China Ag Equipment

China Shifeng GroupEquipment This tractor (larger image) is from the Shifeng Group, the world’s largest farm equipment company in Gaotang, Shandong, China. We took a tour of the manufacturing plants where they build engines, motors, tires and batteries to support the vehicles. The Shifeng Group builds all kinds of trucks, motorized carts, tractors and combines and they have been building electric cars since 2007. They are looking to add new factories to expand on the demand in China. Their market internationally is the developing countries, focusing on South and Central America, India and Africa [Editor note: Combine image, small electric car; text and photos Jim Lease, JBS United].

Greenhouses Rule

Greenhouses RuleGlass All Around This photo (larger image) from Google Earth is significant as to the indications of how China has mobilized and intensified food production. The large areas of gray seen in the top part of the photo is enlarged in the bottom part of the image. Greenhouses are producing every food plant you can imagine. A farmer told us he has two green houses and makes $15,000-$30,000 US a year growing cucumbers. The area of gray in the top part of image covers about 100 square miles. This Google Maps link http://goo.gl/maps/r2Gj can be used to zoom in/out to see the size/scope of greenhouses.

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