feed

SwineCast 0439, New Soybean Varieties Provide Options For Livestock Rations

Down load MP3 SwineCast 0439 Show Notes:

  • Soybean researchers expanding options for livestock producers as new varieties come online.  Conversation with University of IL's Dr Hans Stein

SwineCast 0355 for November 11 2008

SwineCast 0355 Show Notes:

  • Dr Don Mahan looks at gender impact on mineral utilization
  • Net Feed Energy with Degussa's Rob Payne

SwineCast 0310 for June 9 2008

SwineCast 0310 Show Notes:

  • Conversing with Glenn Grimes at World Pork Expo on markets and ratios
  • Tradeshow talk about BASF's Nutridense corn system
  • Iowa State's Suzanne Millman joins us for a followup discussion about her animal welfare presentation at National Institute for Animal Agriculture

SwineCast 0297 for April 22 2008

SwineCast 0297 Show Notes:

  • Looking to cut costs in your ingredient sources may expose you to more risk than you think. A conversation with John Ratcliff of the Food and Agriculture Consultancy of the United Kingdom
  • Genetics are driven by data but who determines the direction? PIC's Technical Services Director for Genetics joins us
  • Employee relations and recruitment questions continue to be heavily attended workshops. Don Tyler recounts a session at the Responsible Pork Symposium

SwineCast 0295 for April 15 2008

SwineCast 0295 Show Notes:

  • $50 million Canadian breeding herd buyout
  • Cargill Pork vet describes positive circovirus vaccine experience with CircoFLEXX
  • Selenium could be an issue in breeding herds if your feed is coming farther from home this year

SwineCast 0288 for March 21 2008

SwineCast 0288 Show Notes:

2008 Iowa Pork Congress: Managing Input Costs: Are There Any Good Options?

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Managing Input Costs: Are There Any Good Options? WMV File

Feed ingredient costs have reached new highs and new levels of volatility. This session will address reasons for the changes, the prospects for future cost levels and some idea about what producers can do to optimize input costs.

Powerpoint file attached below, right click on link and download to your computer.

By Steve Meyer, Paragon Economics

2008 Iowa Pork Congress: Minimizing Feed Costs for Improved Profitability

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To play in full screen, click on square icon on lower right of video (its the full screen toggle button).

To download a Windows Media version to your desktop, right click on link below and save to your local computer.
Minimizing Feed Costs for Improved Profitability WMV File

Joel DeRouchey's presentation will focus on minimizing feed costs by discussing management and formulation practices to increase feed efficiency and how to evaluate alternative feed ingredients.

Powerpoint file attached below, right click on link and download to your computer.

By Joel DeRouchey, Kansas State University

Expectations 2008

     The seats were still warm on the Board of Governors chairs at the FED as they arose to announce their last interest rate cut this month when the DOW plummeted over 200 points.  The past two cuts were met with at least momentarily rising markets but now the expectation is that the FED will need to be much more aggressive in 2008, perhaps one large interest rate cut or two moderate ones to stem the tide of the economic slow down which seems to be appearing (but has not actually arrived in any benchmark statistics yet)..

     Explaining the big drop, commentators pointed out the huge role expectations have in markets.  If you expect more and bigger cuts, these incremental quarter and half percent moves are just delays in the inevitable and investing will have to wait until the big one comes (and lowers the cost of investing even more).  This is the same pattern that is well documented in inflationary times.  If you expect prices to rise, you buy now and that drives up the cost of goods.  If you expect prices to fall, you delay purchases and collectively, that results in a price decline to move building inventory.

SwineCast 0224 for August 7 2007

SwineCast 0224 Show Notes:

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