energy

Dr. Stephen Pohl - "Maintaining" the Bottom Line


"Maintaining" the Bottom Line - Dr. Stephen Pohl, South Dakota State University, from the Iowa Pork Congress, January 27-28, 2010, Des Moines, IA, USA.

U.S. bioenergy policy: Time to refuel?

power

A recently-released policy paper by Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy is questioning the United States’ biofuels policy, and rightly so. The paper, “Fundamentals of a Sustainable U.S. Biofuels Policy,” challenges the economic, environmental and logistical basis for ethanol production.

Cap-and-trade bill: What’s in it for me?

While President Obama is expected to focus on challenges in Afghanistan and a hefty new health care bill this week, many in the farm community are growingly concerned about the future of cap-and-trade legislation, and its implications for farmers. According to University of Illinois agricultural economist and environmental policy guru Madhu Khanna, there are both positive and negative consequences for American farmers in a climate bill that would define the nation’s first-ever mandatory limit on heat-trapping gases, in an effort to slow-down global warming effects.

Dr. Bob Morrison - It's a Small World: Carbon Credits


It's a Small World: Carbon Credits - Dr. Bob Morrison, University of Minnesota, 2009 Carthage Vet Service Annual Swine Conference, coverage sponsored by Suvaxyn from Fort Dodge, September 1, 2009, Malcomb, Illinois, USA.

Precision Agriculture: The Strategic Future of Animal Production


Precision Agriculture: The Strategic Future of Animal Production - Dr. Dennis DiPietre KnowledgeVentures LLC, at the Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. Swine Health Seminar, August 15, 2009, Carolina Beach, North Carolina, USA.

Precision Agriculture: The Strategic Future of Animal Production - PIP


Precision Agriculture: The Strategic Future of Animal Production - Dr. Dennis DiPietre KnowledgeVentures LLC, at the Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. Swine Health Seminar, August 15, 2009, Carolina Beach, North Carolina, USA.

I've Found a Perfect Job Opportunity...Now What?

So, I’ve found the perfect agriculture career opportunity - Now what do I do? The answer to the question seems obvious. Step one. Make sure my resume is up to date. Step two. Draft a cover letter. Step three. Submit the application. Step four. Wait, and hope for the best. If you are like most job seekers, this is the way you go about applying for new jobs. But, if you are looking to make a step out from the crowd - you might try a few other tricks!

Once you’ve located what you think to be the perfect opportunity - do some brainstorming about who you know that might have a connection to the company. Is there someone in your personal network that can make a call on your behalf? This is one tried and true tactic that will help you get the interview.

More Meddling in Markets or "The Problem of Too Many Balls in the Air" Revisited

     We have in the US energy policy regarding ethanol an illustration of the classic problem in economics which I like to call "too many balls in the air".  When it comes to economic thinking and analysis, individuals or groups with "skin in the game" tend to focus tightly on the single variable they want to improve (like the corn price in the case of ethanol) and fail to understand that markets are complex interactions of sometimes hundreds of linked transactions and markets all of which can and usually are affected by extra-market interventions to move the target variable.  There are economic models that can and do attempt to account for all of these impacts simulataneously and track the movement to a new equilibrium in all affected markets but they can be large and clumsy and not very good at tracking the short term movements to new long term equilibria.

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