Economics

2009 Carolina Swine Health Seminar Presentations


Selected presentations from the Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. Swine Health Seminar, August 15, 2009, Carolina Beach, North Carolina, USA.

For full screen, click on player below.

Assessing the Economic Impact of Swine Disease - The Case of PRRS


Assessing the Economic Impact of Swine Disease - The Case of PRRS - Dr. James Kliebenstein, Ph.D. Iowa State University, at the Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. Swine Health Seminar, August 15, 2009, Carolina Beach, North Carolina, USA.

Assessing the Economic Impact of Swine Disease - The Case of PRRS - PIP


Assessing the Economic Impact of Swine Disease - The Case of PRRS - Dr. James Kliebenstein, Ph.D. Iowa State University, at the Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. Swine Health Seminar, August 15, 2009, Carolina Beach, North Carolina, USA.

SwineCast 0453, NPPC Requests Washington Step Up Purchases and Review Input Prices

Download mp3SwineCast 0453 Show Notes:

  • Special NPPC conference with President Don Butler, CEO Neil Dierks and economist Steve Meyer outlining the shopping list they're sending to Washington

How the "Tragedy of the Commons" Can Become Even More Tragic

The "tragedy of the commons" is an idea put forward by Garrett Hardin in the late 1960's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tragedy_of_the_commons), describing how commonly held resources are supposed to be stripped to nothing when those who use them act solely on self-interest instead of in the common good. The notion is that a community resource will be over-used when individuals apply their private profit calculation to how much of it they will employ.

Hispanic Labor in the Swine Industry… a Thing of the Past?

Hispanic Labor in the Swine Industry… a Thing of the Past? Presented at the 2009 World Pork Expo, By Orlando Gil

For full screen, click on player below.

SwineCast 0450, Large Hog States Ask For Government Help

Download mp3SwineCast 0450 Show Notes:

  • Iowa Governor joins with industry executives to ask government to step up with another pork purchase for food programs.  Audio from press conference.

Political Food for Thought: Organic Food Takes a Hit

I am sure there are some true believers really hitting the ceiling today after the release of the meta-study published this month in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition entitled "Nutritional Quality of Organic Foods: A Systematic Review".  This journal is certainly not "in the pocket" of major agri-business interest nor is the institute which conducted the analysis: The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.  

Here is the money quote: “On the basis of a systematic review of studies of satisfactory quality, there is no evidence of a difference in nutrient quality between organically and conventionally produced foodstuffs. The small differences in nutrient content detected are biologically plausible and mostly relate to differences in production methods.”

The New Wedge Between Crops and Livestock: Government Policy

In one sense, there has always been a certain conflict between crops and livestock since they tend to benefit from each other when the one is not doing so well at least price-wise.  When crop prices are low, at least temporarily, livestock producers gain profits through lower cost of production.  When crop prices skyrocket, livestock producers tend to struggle until a passthrough occurs or some adjustments take place.  In the past however, there were good reasons for the two major arms of U.S. Ag to talk about their symbiosis and protect each other's interests.  That's when the vast majority of U.S. produced corn, for instance, was destined to be livestock feed.  That dynamic is changing largely due to government policy changes. 

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