China

SwineCast 1049, Economic Opportunity: Keeping African Swine Fever Out of USA

SwineCast 1049 Show Notes:
  • From the 2019 Minnesota Pork Congress, Dr. Scott Dee, Research Director at Pipestone, and Dr. Gordon Spronk, Chairman of the Board, Pipestone Holdings, review the global concern on the African Swine Fever virus and comment that keeping ASF out of the United States is an economic opportunity for US pork producers.

Case Studies from the Middle Kingdom, Or What Chinese Vets Think You Should Know

Case Studies from the Middle KingdomCase Studies from the Middle Kingdom Dr. Keith Erlandson, Director of Veterinary Services, Swine Lines, for the CP Group China, shares his perspective on What Chinese Vets Think You Should Know.

Dr. Erlandson shares his personal views of how pork production in China is evolving. Key takeaways: In China, hiring good employees is hard, building efficient systems for the good of the farm is difficult, and the study of production veterinary practice is not as well developed as in the USA [video].

Dr. Keith Erlandson - Case Studies from the Middle Kingdom


Case Studies from the Middle Kingdom - Dr. Keith Erlandson, from the 2017 Allen D. Leman Swine Conference, September 16-19, 2017, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA.

SwineCast 0995, Leman - What Chinese Vets Think You Should Know

SwineCast 0995 Show Notes:
  • Dr. Keith Erlandson, Director of Veterinary Services, Swine Lines, for the CP Group China, shares his perspective on What Chinese Vets Think You Should Know..., from the 2017 Leman Conference Hot Topics session.

Snapshot of U.S. Exports & International Trade

U.S. Exports & International Trade - PORK AcademyU.S. Exports & International Trade - PORK Academy Dr. Dermot Hayes, Iowa State University, walks through a detailed analysis of the global pork trade and how China is changing to meet their pork supply needs. Dr. Hayes' take aways: "China is driving world pork markets and will do so for at least 18 months." and "Unless new subsidies are introduced in China, imports should continue to grow. New subsidies will happen if China becomes concerned about a trade war." [video].

Dr. Hanchun Yang - Pathogenesis and control of Chinese highly pathogenic Porcine Reproductive & Respiratory Syndrome (PRRSV)


Pathogenesis and control of Chinese highly pathogenic Porcine Reproductive & Respiratory Syndrome (PRRSV) - Dr. Hanchun Yang, China Agricultural University, from the 2016 North American PRRS Symposium, December 3‐4, 2016, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Trade and Exports: US Pork Focus On Risks

U.S. Exports & International TradeU.S. Exports & International Trade Becca Nepple, National Pork Board, and Dr. Dermot Hayes, Iowa State University, provide highlights and details on the state of global trade. Two of the questions they address is "Why is the US Pork Market so Sensitive to Exports?" and "How long will the China opportunity last?" Dr. Hayes closes with two key points: The long run opportunities for US pork are enormous, especially if we continue to implement trade agreements, and over-reliance on China brings enormous risks (South China Sea, Steel, Chicken, DDGS, Self Sufficiency, Trump) [video].

Becca Nepple, Dr. Dermot Hayes - U.S. Exports & International Trade


U.S. Exports & International Trade - Becca Nepple, National Pork Board and Dr. Dermot Hayes, Iowa State University, from the 2016 World Pork Expo, June 8 - 10, 2016, Des Moines, IA, USA.

It's What China Doesn't Do

China Growth Slowing of China's Economy Impacts to Pork China's export based economy is trying to make the transition to a Chinese consumer based economy. Impacting China is the drought and their need to import corn and soybean to feed their 400 million pigs. This NPR episode shares some insight on the Chinese economy and what pork and crop producers in the US should consider [audio].

China's economic boom has altered the global economy but its growth is slowing down. Steve Inskeep talks to Beijing-based economist Patrick Chovanec about China's economic troubles, and how that affects the U.S. economy.

American Observations on Life in China

Life in ChinaCities and Swine Seemingly everywhere one looks China offers two views of today. Outside the Weifang train station, open spaces and modern, even futuristic buildings give the appearance of a prosperous nation ready to lead on the world stage. In truth, many of the offices and apartments we observed were empty. The leaders use construction to employ the people on the assumption that it's cheaper to build today than it will be tomorrow. Inside these buildings are cement walls and roughed in plumbing. Around the corner you see workers on a bamboo raft clearing algae from a retention pond, using technology of decades past.

My recent China sojourn, with JBS-United, was a reminder of the massive changes our North American swine industry has embraced. Internal issues (genetics, disease, feed quality) and external issues (feed costs, blasted hot weather, immigration) have been dealt with and cataloged for future "black swan" events. The overwhelming sense of purpose, unity, vast resources that I viewed as we traveled is offset by flexibility, adaptability, hygiene and husbandry here at home. It's easy to be awed by the China machine but we have the lead and the know-how to maintain it [Editor note: text and photo Ned Arthur, SwineCast].

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